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View Poll Results: Would you prefer to see inches or not?

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  • 23 (EU48 w. shorter leg) / 96 cm (approx 37 inch) w. inseam leg 78 cm (approx 30 cm)

    16 66.67%
  • 23 (EU48 w. shorter leg) / 96 cm w. inseam leg 78 cm

    8 33.33%
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  1. #1
    Established TDF Member Finless's Avatar
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    Non diving market research.

    I sell one suppliers goods on my website. The supplier is based in Denmark and their default unit of measurement is the centimetre (ie metric), however, even they feel the need to quote Imperial sizes (but rounded to the nearest whole inch which can be nearly inch out).

    Which would you prefer to see - just the metric or the metric + Imperial measurements.

    Thanks for taking part (I hope).
    Last edited by Finless; 25-01-2022 at 11:27 AM.

  2. #2
    Established TDF Member Finless's Avatar
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    Oh, BTW, I have made a mistake with the numbers but it is only the appearance and information given that matters.

  3. #3
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    Definitely needs to see both - that is doing what should have been done when froggie measurements were brought into use in the '70's. Friends kids, brought up in California in the '70's were taught both measurement systems at school and visualise sizes in either measurement systems. If we had been taught the same we wouldn't have the problems we have today and HMG actually now saying we can use either system - I'd say that is sense not regression - I expect the (common use of the) imperial system to eventually die out.
    Us poor brit's the measurements we understood and could visualise removed in one swoop and most people over school age had no idea what was what. I've had to use both systems for years and can understand most things but some of the practical sizing short cuts are never taught e.g. 100mm is roughly the width of a hand - as used for years in the horsey community.

  4. #4
    TDF Member sean0801's Avatar
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    I'm 52 and only ever use metric unless I'm driving or drinking 😀

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean0801 View Post
    I'm 52 and only ever use metric unless I'm driving or drinking ��
    Blame our American cousins for the standard/imperial system still being around. They are going metric inch by inch. I thought I had seen the end of inches etc until I worked with them.

    Probably best not to use drinking and driving in the same sentence.

  6. #6
    Established TDF Member Finless's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkA View Post
    Probably best not to use drinking and driving in the same sentence.
    Indeed, there is a severe danger of spilling it.

    Is metric good for engineering? I would thought that 1/8, 1/16/ 1/32 were quite essential?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finless View Post
    Is metric good for engineering? I would thought that 1/8, 1/16/ 1/32 were quite essential?
    Although they were designing and building new machines in metric. Anything to do with pneumatics or hydraulics was still in inches. Not a problem now as the US factory closed.

  8. #8
    Established TDF Member Energy58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finless View Post

    Is metric good for engineering? I would thought that 1/8, 1/16/ 1/32 were quite essential?
    It will take for ever to get rid of imperial sizes even if they are actually expressed in metric or are some bastardised close enough version - for example plasterboard sheets are manufactured as 1220mm nominal which just happens to be four feet (to within 3/100 of an inch).

  9. #9
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    A work colleague moved to Sweden with his job. He went to buy some wood there and asked for some 100 x 50 mm. The guy in the timber yard looked puzzled and said 'Oh, you mean 4x2'.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Energy58 View Post
    It will take for ever to get rid of imperial sizes even if they are actually expressed in metric or are some bastardised close enough version - for example plasterboard sheets are manufactured as 1220mm nominal which just happens to be four feet (to within 3/100 of an inch).
    I suspect that sheet sizes in particular will never change - 8x4 sheet (2440x1220) is standard for virtually all sheet materials in construction including plywood (finished and construction), MDF, cement board etc. Unless there is a major reason to change it (which might impact on the production machinery) then it will stay in that format (or smaller sizes cut from that).


 
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