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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finless View Post
    I have enough pole (I think but I'm not sure about the curtain). If I go too far past the end then I will end up with a curtained wall.

    I think that I am committed to my holes unless there is a danger of damaging the lintel. Having bought the kit and only need another 5-10mm.

    I assume that some (most?) of the rawl plug is in the plaster rather than the lintel but so long as it fixes tight when being screwed then it'll do for me.
    When using rawlplugs (especially if carrying a decent load), you should really try to ensure that the plug is seated as far as possible into the structure and not the plaster - the plaster will have virtually no bearing strength.

    What I picked up from tradesmen was that they normally drilled the hole deeper than the plug (by about the thickness of the plaster), put the plug in the hole until it is flush, insert the screw part way in (just enough to seat it) and then tap the fitting into the hole until the plug gets to depth. Then remove the screw, insert it in to the item to be fitted and then screw that into the plug.
    Sounds complicated but watch the video (rawplugs into plasterboard covered wall is approx 5.06) -

  2. #22
    Established TDF Member Finless's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neilwood View Post
    When using rawlplugs (especially if carrying a decent load), you should really try to ensure that the plug is seated as far as possible into the structure and not the plaster - the plaster will have virtually no bearing strength.

    What I picked up from tradesmen was that they normally drilled the hole deeper than the plug (by about the thickness of the plaster), put the plug in the hole until it is flush, insert the screw part way in (just enough to seat it) and then tap the fitting into the hole until the plug gets to depth. Then remove the screw, insert it in to the item to be fitted and then screw that into the plug.
    Sounds complicated but watch the video (rawplugs into plasterboard covered wall is approx 5.06) -
    I’m being lazy and going to the depth of the supplied screws/plugs. If need be then I’ll use longer.

    With my new drill I could probably drill through to the outside, use a threaded rod with nut and washer.

  3. #23
    Confused? You will be. Jay_Benson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finless View Post
    With my new drill I could probably drill through to the outside, use a threaded rod with nut and washer.
    That would probably hold.
    For information to help you plan your dive trip in the UK and Eire try www.planyourdivetrip.co.uk

    Public transport planning info at www.traveline.info

  4. #24
    Established TDF Member taz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Finless View Post
    I’m being lazy and going to the depth of the supplied screws/plugs. If need be then I’ll use longer.

    With my new drill I could probably drill through to the outside, use a threaded rod with nut and washer.


    Fred Dibnah did that to hold the front of his house onto the back part.

    taz

    .
    .. ... -. .----. - / -- --- .-. ... . / -.-. --- -.. . / --. --- --- -..

  5. #25
    Confused? You will be. Jay_Benson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taz View Post
    Fred Dibnah did that to hold the front of his house onto the back part.

    taz

    .
    Don’t a largish number of older houses have very long bolts running from one side to the other with the ends having crossed pieces of plate or circular pieces? From memory they are to hold the houses together.
    For information to help you plan your dive trip in the UK and Eire try www.planyourdivetrip.co.uk

    Public transport planning info at www.traveline.info

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by taz View Post
    Fred Dibnah did that to hold the front of his house onto the back part.

    taz

    .
    When I was a surveyor, a lad in the office got instructions to do a survey on that house...... Luckily he noticed before and passed it off to someone else (not me, thank FSM).

  7. #27
    Established TDF Member taz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay_Benson View Post
    Don’t a largish number of older houses have very long bolts running from one side to the other with the ends having crossed pieces of plate or circular pieces? From memory they are to hold the houses together.
    In my neck of the woods there are a lot of builds both domestic and commercial that
    are bolted through to hold the building together. I don't know if Yorkshire is more
    susceptible to subsidence but coal mining from the 1900's have undermined most
    towns and villages.

    An old collier told me when the power station near us was built in the 1950's - 1960's
    they were not allowed to mine underneath it. When they mined in an industrial scale
    they dug 2 parallel tunnels a few hundred metres apart and then the coal mining
    machine used to move left to right across the coal face from tunnel to tunnel.

    As the coal was dug the face moved forward and the supports were removed so the
    ceiling was allowed to collapse behind it. As the face moved forward there was a gap
    in the ground about 2mtrs high and a few hundred metres long. As the ceilings collapsed
    the ground above slowly sags.

    These tunnels were hundreds of metres deep some almost a mile deep so it takes a
    long time for the subsidence to show.

    taz

    .
    Last edited by taz; 27-01-2022 at 07:32 AM.
    .. ... -. .----. - / -- --- .-. ... . / -.-. --- -.. . / --. --- --- -..

  8. #28
    Established TDF Member jamesp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taz View Post
    In my neck of the woods there are a lot of builds both domestic and commercial that
    are bolted through to hold the building together. I don't know if Yorkshire is more
    susceptible to subsidence but coal mining from the 1900's have undermined most
    towns and villages.

    An old collier told me when the power station near us was built in the 1950's - 1960's
    they were not allowed to mine underneath it. When they mined in an industrial scale
    they dug 2 parallel tunnels a few hundred metres apart and then the coal mining
    machine used to move left to right across the coal face from tunnel to tunnel.

    As the coal was dug the face moved forward and the supports were removed so the
    ceiling was allowed to collapse behind it. As the face moved forward there was a gap
    in the ground about 2mtrs high and a few hundred metres long. As the ceilings collapsed
    the ground above slowly sags.

    These tunnels were hundreds of metres deep some almost a mile deep so it takes a
    long time for the subsidence to show.

    taz

    .
    One of the local pits (closed 1967) was among the deepest in the country, main shaft was 940yds.
    The UK limit was 1000yds, you could drive down from that, but the lift shaft was limited.
    There is a piece of road within half a mile of it, known as the straight mile, subsidence was so bad on that, that a double decker bus could disappear in the dips along it.
    These days you can see the road from one end to the other.
    I was once at a talk by a retired Mine engineer, he indicated that the affected area was roughly 45 from the deepest point to the surface;
    At Llay main, the face was several miles from the shaft.

  9. #29
    Established TDF Member steelemonkey's Avatar
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    There is a road in Northampton, near the football ground, that is like a roller coaster because it was built on landfill.
    Paul.
    If God had meant us to breathe underwater, he would have given us larger bank balances.
    Human beings were invented by water as a means of moving itself from one place to another.

  10. #30
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    Think yourselves lucky.

    Part of the Ruhr valley has subsided to below the level of the river Boye outflow and must now be pumped permanently, and presumably for ever, otherwise it would become the Ruhr lake.


 
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