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  1. #21
    #keepittea ebt's Avatar
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    There's lots of techniques you can use, yawning, wiggling your jaw, swallowing, lifting your chin..... etc etc.... but ultimately the best advice is do it often and take it slowly.

    Once you traumatise the middle ear/eustachian tubes you risk making it all harder, possibly for days afterwards.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by NW6 1TH View Post
    Thanks a lot! My friend says that then the raspberry she heard must have been the air coming out. But probably the fact that it was so long and so loud means too much air had already been expanding there, so even if it finally managed to escape, she'd better try to swallow also on ascending. They told us not to worry about equalising during ascent, but it seems some people must still be careful about it.

    Now my friend is even more worried than before. She says that if gurning solves the problem, it'll be perfect, but otherwise, descending won't be the only stressful part of the dive for her. Let's hope she can equalise by moving her jaw.
    There are a very small number of people, for one reason or another, can not equalise. Iíve only come across one in nearly 40 year teaching diving.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickpicks View Post
    Blocked ears whilst descending, or reverse block when ascending can both cause ruptured eardrums if the pressure isn't equalised. I don't think the eardrum is stronger in one direction than the other.

    Most people don't notice their ears equalising on ascent, as the equalisation usually "just sorts itself out" whereas many people have to take action whilst descending (usually valsalva).
    I think the only problem generally is the speed of ascent not matching the speed of equalising (due to physical issues or congestion).
    Quote Originally Posted by ebt View Post
    There's lots of techniques you can use, yawning, wiggling your jaw, swallowing, lifting your chin..... etc etc.... but ultimately the best advice is do it often and take it slowly.

    Once you traumatise the middle ear/eustachian tubes you risk making it all harder, possibly for days afterwards.
    As you note the best advice is do it often and take it slowly. Also equalise BEFORE there is any pressure build up both ascending and descending. Done this way there should never be any pain or ear damage.


 
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