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Thread: Cataract Op

  1. #11
    Established TDF Member steelemonkey's Avatar
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    One of my customers make scalpels for cataract ops. They are fascinating things, shaped so that the cut made is a bit like a lock gate on a canal, so that the internal pressure forces the cut to close.
    Paul.
    If God had meant us to breathe underwater, he would have given us larger bank balances.
    Human beings were invented by water as a means of moving itself from one place to another.

  2. #12
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    I only had drops in the eyes .
    I trust my rebreather implicitly I just don't trust the owner

    Onwards & downwards.

  3. #13
    Established TDF Member taz's Avatar
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    .

    Is it just me or does anybody else react the same way when talking about cutting eyeballs?
    My dad had both done many years ago and my mum had one done a few years ago but the
    thought of laying there looking up waiting gives me the Heebie jeebies every time.

    taz

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  4. #14
    Established TDF Member jamesp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taz View Post
    .

    Is it just me or does anybody else react the same way when talking about cutting eyeballs?
    My dad had both done many years ago and my mum had one done a few years ago but the
    thought of laying there looking up waiting gives me the Heebie jeebies every time.

    taz

    .
    Same here, I could watch any medical procedure on tv unless it was eyes.
    I was that bad that I was even reluctant to try contact lenses.

  5. #15
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    I've worn contacts for more than 40 years (not the same ones) and I can't watch eye ops. Love watching anything else though. I took my dad in for a cataract op when he was in his late 80's. He walked out and said, nah, it was fine, no problem at all. He did fight in the war though......

  6. #16
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    I can pull my own ingrowing toe nails out, pull teeth out using nothing more than pliers & a screwdriver BUT when I was asked how I felt about my upcoming cataract op they got 2 words :-

    FUCKING PETRIFIED !!!!!
    I trust my rebreather implicitly I just don't trust the owner

    Onwards & downwards.

  7. #17
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    I used contacts for diving for quite a few years and due to being squeamish about eyes disliked putting them in and HATED taking them out.

    I decided that I would get lens replacement to correct my eyes (not enough lens to re-shape with laser to correct the level of short sightedness I had), and was petrified about the procedure and discussed sedatives.
    In the end they convinced me to try with just the drops, and I couldn't see anything that was going on, and in fact the worst part was when they cut the flap in the cloth over my face (could feel the scissors touching the skin near the eye), when I went back for the 2nd eye a week later it felt like a breeze with no worries at all.

    I went for the mono-focal option as I was told there was a smaller chance of flares around bright lights, I can notice them sometimes anyway and think I should have gone for a multi-focal option as I do need glasses now for reading and computer use.

  8. #18
    Established TDF Member taz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barnaby_s View Post
    I used contacts for diving for quite a few years and due to being squeamish about eyes disliked putting them in and HATED taking them out.

    I decided that I would get lens replacement to correct my eyes (not enough lens to re-shape with laser to correct the level of short sightedness I had), and was petrified about the procedure and discussed sedatives.
    In the end they convinced me to try with just the drops, and I couldn't see anything that was going on, and in fact the worst part was when they cut the flap in the cloth over my face (could feel the scissors touching the skin near the eye), when I went back for the 2nd eye a week later it felt like a breeze with no worries at all.

    I went for the mono-focal option as I was told there was a smaller chance of flares around bright lights, I can notice them sometimes anyway and think I should have gone for a multi-focal option as I do need glasses now for reading and computer use.
    You might be able to explain then? If somebody needs by-focal or vary-focal lenses because of age would a lens replacement mean they have
    normal vision again or like you will they require glasses to treat the long or the short vision?

    What I'm trying to ask is, if you have a new lens do you have new eyes or will you need to wear glasses afterwords?

    taz.

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  9. #19
    Prior Member Tim Digger's Avatar
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    I am not an ophthalmic surgeon so the following may not be completely accurate. Most short or long sightedness occurring or being detected in older children and young adults is a consequence of a mismatch between the refraction (light bending) of the cornea (thin clear bit at the front) and the shape (roundness or lack of it) at the back of the eye (retina) where the light is focussed. The lens suspended in the light path between the anterior chamber (front of eye) and the posterior chamber (back part of eye containing clear goo) is there to adjust the focussing of light on to the cells (pixels) of the retina. As the eye ages most lenses get stiffer so the ability to adjust the focus so that close up objects appear clear steadily decreases, hence the need for reading glasses even for those previously blessed with perfect vision. If you needed glasses to correct any visual defect as a young adult even if at that age the lenses ability to correctly focus close objects was adequate then as ageing occurs the stiffer lens cannot so bifocals and varifocals are needed (or two pairs of glasses on string around the neck).
    Couple that with the potential to develop cataracts which impair light transmission through the lens and the steady loss of retinal cells (effectively changing a 24 megapixel sensor to a 3mepixel sensor) then it is hardly surprising vision deteriorates with age.
    In cataract ops replacing the lens in originally short sighted people it is common to use different strength lenses in different eyes as the ability of the brain to compensate for different size images means that clear focus of near or distant objects can be maintained with one eye or the other and the brain adjusts the perceived image (within limits).
    Hope this helps.
    Evolution is great at solving problems. It's the methods that concern me.
    Tim Digger

  10. #20
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    Are these replacement lenses not stiff then? I get that the lens can be designed to correct short- or long-sightedness but if it's not deformable then how does the eye focus?


 
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