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  1. #11
    Coastal Member dwhitlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barrygoss View Post
    Oh and you needed to buy two. I did, it made finding buddies easier.

    Oh and flow stops on bailout - oc gear. The purge of shame is nothing to be proud of.
    two excellent tips there and if you need two then a spare is probably helpful

    The purge of shame can be seen here
    Last edited by dwhitlow; 28-12-2020 at 09:37 AM.

  2. #12
    Established TDF Member
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    Thanks very much for those tips - really appreciated.

    Excellent point about a flow-stop on the bailout; "good" to see it flowing in that amazing video.
    Q: how reliable are flowstops? Do they fail at all? (ignoring user error)

    Such staggering visibility in that video, especially the descent; could almost be not the British Isles. Can't wait to get to Malin.

    Nose clips: how long? Was thinking of rigging one with a ~20cm tail, but with somewhere to clip it tight when not in use.

    Am fortunate to have a Nerd backup which has a compass. Will look at options for mounting a compass on the scooter though for those solo OC days. Similarly want to mount a camera ball.


    Point about two scooters is taken. Alas the bonus didn't stretch that far!


    Couple of things I've learned when developing dive skills: change only one thing at a time; take it slowly and don't be a dick.

  3. #13
    Established TDF Member Iain Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barrygoss View Post
    And a split S is just the coolest way to leave a dive site.
    Leaving a dive site with a split-S will usually result in either a head injury or significant cosmetic damage to the front of the scooter...or a complete silt-out.

    Did Sir perhaps mean an Immelmann?

    Having said that, I did, one one occasion run up the gunníle of the Ulysses in the Red Sea on the trigger, into a split-S back to the seabed and repeat.

    After spending the next day feeling like I had been hit by a truck, I suddenly clocked that the gunníle of the Ulysses runs from about 30m to 6m...

    Top tip: donít do that.

  4. #14
    Established TDF Member steelemonkey's Avatar
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    It sounds to me that these are the most fun way of killing yourself yet invented.
    Paul.
    If God had meant us to breathe underwater, he would have given us larger bank balances.
    Human beings were invented by water as a means of moving itself from one place to another.

  5. #15
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    One of the best videos of diving of Malin imho.

  6. #16
    Established TDF Member Steve Clark's Avatar
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    Go and play with it. A lot. Make loads of mistakes somewhere where you are not missing the wreck etc.

    Have a plan for the light and hands. You'll need it to track your buddy properly. Convention is light left, scooter right. Light on right thumb if you need a spare hand.

    If you're in a quarry, you no longer need to be working 0-2m off the floor. If the viz is good, you can do a lot more mid-water and gun it between 'attractions'

    Get comfortable scootering through holes. This gives you much better perception of where your body is, keeping your knees up and fins flat etc.

    Learn when to adjust buoyancy and when not to bother. You have thrust so you can easily go up 3m to go over something and come back down and retain your original buoyancy.

    Get used to quickly changing from on the trigger to holding the nose cone. Never let go of a scooter that's turned on. They do start by themselves and that's quite dangerous if it's between your legs on the tow cord.

    Be even slicker on the boat. It's another thing to carry, probably another trip from the car. Don't piss off the skipper bringing a load of extra gear along too.

    Have a plan for losing your buddy. Which you will. Usual rules don't necessarily need to apply. You can go find people if you know what they are likely to do. I did 7 laps of the James Egan Layne in one dive and only got out because I'd ripped the dump valve off my shoulder going for a gap between beams on my side.

    If it's not deep and you're not using the scooter for carefully lugging multiple tanks, just leave the breather at home.
    Last edited by Steve Clark; 28-12-2020 at 03:25 PM.

  7. #17
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    They can bite you on the arse obviously, 1 of the tragedies on a recent Britannic trip was potentially linked to a scooter incident.

    The potential to ascend and descend quickly especially over the course of an OHE dive needs to be recognised, Steve Boegarts considers that this may have been a contributing factor to his career ending DCS, it was too easy not to come off the trigger for a 3-5m change in depth.

  8. #18
    Coastal Member dwhitlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barrygoss View Post
    Donít go down under power
    A powered descent does require familiarity with scootering and is definitely not recommended at first. It can save a lot of work when there is a current running, is a lot of fun, but does introduce new failure options, in addition to the usual ones, and increases the risk of losing the shotline.

    To avoid a ppo2 spike a powered descent is best done with a deeper autoswitch depth. I recall doing NDAC with 20m switch depth and getting ppo2 of 1.7 at the bottom and noting the 15/55 diluent didn't offer much scope for a diluent flush being helpful. Before resuming our travels we paused and watched the ppo2 drop.

    Also, as the power of the scooter can overcome quite a lot of excess buoyancy (such as a significantly inflated wing!) adjusting for neutral buoyancy is important. This should be done after any significant change in depth. Releasing the trigger and finding yourself floating upward can be disconcerting.

    Whilst not an issue with the BlackTip, if using Sierra, Cuda, Piranha, and many others scooters, NEVER release the handle of the scooter without first locking the trigger. If the tow cord catches on the trigger and activates the motor you are in for a very memorable experience. The best demonstration I've seen was a diver releasing the handle to put a tag on the line. Hanging onto the shot line whilst the scooter tries to pull you away is not a good look!
    Quote Originally Posted by Wibs View Post
    Excellent point about a flow-stop on the bailout; "good" to see it flowing in that amazing video.
    Q: how reliable are flowstops? Do they fail at all? (ignoring user error)
    A flowstop is a very simple and reliable device which needs occasional cleaning. I've never had one fail but they are prone to salt build-up and stiffness if not loved enough. I don't have one on my deep bailout (they do reduce flow rate) but do have one on my deco bottle.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wibs View Post
    Such staggering visibility in that video, especially the descent; could almost be not the British Isles. Can't wait to get to Malin.

    Nose clips: how long? Was thinking of rigging one with a ~20cm tail, but with somewhere to clip it tight when not in use.
    What works best depends on how buoyant your scooter is and how you organise your bailouts. I just use a double-ender I clip on the short bungee loop on the nose. That in turn clips to the right shoulder d-ring. Another option is having a d-ring on the battery canister.

  9. #19
    Established TDF Member bubbleless's Avatar
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    Tip if the scooter is clipped onto you ,, make sure its switched off.(if you have an external switch)
    As its really fun when you clip it on and catch the trigger..

  10. #20
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    If putting flow stops on your bail outs I would advise putting a pressure relief valve on the first stage as well, otherwise with the flow stop closed a first stage fault... or in fact ascending... might cause something to go bang.


 
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