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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by cathal View Post
    A risk is an O2 leak from a pillar valve, that would create an O2 rich environment that could be ignited by a spark. So, you could use a valve plug on any rich O2 mix. This would do two things; firstly it would stop any leak from a faulty pillar valve and secondly by having to depressurise that plug it would alert you to the leak.
    It's a very small risk unless you have a confined space with very little to no air circulation, and a significant leak I suspect? If the space the cylinders are to be stored in is like that, don't store any hypoxic mixtures there either, as you could also asphxyiate yourself should they leak. But I doubt anyone's cupboard really qualifies. As for the plugs, I don't think many if any would really stop a significant leak, as most are not designed to hold any significant pressure, and many have little holes to allow it to leak away rather than explode.
    The views expressed are my own, worth what you've paid for them, are not on behalf of anyone else and not those of any company I work for etc.

  2. #22
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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jturner View Post
    It's a very small risk unless you have a confined space with very little to no air circulation, and a significant leak I suspect?
    Agreed, but while its one of low risk, the consequences are potentially very high with an O2 fire.

    Quote Originally Posted by jturner View Post
    As for the plugs, I don't think many if any would really stop a significant leak, as most are not designed to hold any significant pressure, and many have little holes to allow it to leak away rather than explode.
    Not sure which ones you have in mind. Mine will hold 232 bar for as long as you want. Here's an example - https://www.deepstop.de/en/valve-acc...eed-screw.html

  4. #24
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    Last edited by graham_hk; 02-12-2020 at 06:57 PM.

  5. #25
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    Last edited by graham_hk; 02-12-2020 at 06:58 PM.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wibs View Post
    Ok, but what problem are you trying to solve here? Narked's stuff is usually excellent, so I have no doubt these will work, but I'm not sure that will help with the OP's scenario. In your situation with crappy pillar valves, they will still be crap and leaky, only you'll have put a plug in... why not get them fixed and not need the plug?!! They shouldn't leak - heaven knows they are supposedly premium quality, so they shouldn't leak. These things seem like a solution looking for a problem for the vast majority of divers. If you're transporting cylinders around a lot under bumpy conditions where gas loss was critical and they could get nudged and turned on my mistake, I can understand it. But that rules out nearly everyone outside of an expedition.

    Quote Originally Posted by cathal View Post
    Agreed, but while its one of low risk, the consequences are potentially very high with an O2 fire.
    Yes, but risk has be balanced, as I'm sure you know. Severity is potentially high, yes. Detectability is fairly low perhaps. Occurance is very very low. More ventilation on your storage location would be a better solution? Don't leave O2 cylinders in a virtually airtight box with a source of ignition!

    Quote Originally Posted by cathal View Post
    Not sure which ones you have in mind. Mine will hold 232 bar for as long as you want. Here's an example - https://www.deepstop.de/en/valve-acc...eed-screw.html
    The normal bog-standard ones that cost pence and are only supposed to keep the cockroaches and dirt out of the fitting - the ones the vast majority of us use!!! But I also refer you to my answer to Wibs - yours might be able to hold 232bar as long as you want, but why would you want it to hold it at all?!! If I nudge a valve, I turn it off and have lost a few bar at worst. That'll teach me for being ham-fisted and clumsy with gas cylinders. If it's leaking, I get it fixed. If I didn't notice the leak, then I will lose the gas and learn my lesson. I'd prefer to address the root cause rather than put in a solution that also brings it's own issues (you only need to talk to the airgunnners to see how often small bleed screws leak). If I were going somewhere that needed me to hike carrying kit or go down a bumpy road with them in the back, these would be the right tool for the job, but for storage a cylinder in a shed/garage/under the stairs, it seems somewhat OTT. YMMV.
    The views expressed are my own, worth what you've paid for them, are not on behalf of anyone else and not those of any company I work for etc.

  7. #27
    Established TDF Member jamesp's Avatar
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    I once saw someone pick a cylinder up and accidentally roll the valve as they did so.
    There was a wood eating rodent type plastic plug in the valve at the time, which instantly turned into high velocity shrapnel upon being introduced to 232 bar.
    That made a few people jump, not a lot of blood though.

  8. #28
    Established TDF Member witchieblackcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cathal View Post
    Afaik, no one requires you to have insurance while renting a flat, but if you would like to have, say contents insurance for all of your possessions, then the fact that you are storing diving cylinders in the flat may become an issue when getting a quote. I am aware of at least one insurance company over here who will not offer home insurance if diving cylinders of air let alone any O2, are stored on the premises.
    If you were dumb enough to tell the insurance company that you had diving cylinders in the property you're probably going to get a massive premium because of it.
    My insurance company knows that I'm a diver and insures my rebreather as a specified item. It's just a possession with a value to them.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by witchieblackcat View Post
    If you were dumb enough to tell the insurance company that you had diving cylinders in the property you're probably going to get a massive premium because of it.
    It would be interesting to see how your insurance company processes your claim in the event of an O2 fire when you have not declared that you are storing any diving cylinders on the premises or even in an outshed.
    As I said, at least one insurance company over here refused to offer home insurance in the basis of having dive cylinders stored in a shed on the premises. I would expect that failing to declare them being stored on the premises would invalidate your policy and
    any claim.

  10. #30
    Gone diving back later Vanny's Avatar
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    I would strongly advise against storing cylinders or other flammable materials, paint , thinners , aerosols etc under the stairs. It’s likely your main escape route and when it’s alight it’s a real bummer.


 
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