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  1. #11
    Gone diving back later Vanny's Avatar
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    Re fire service. At an individual diver level the main interest will be what and how much , this can be recorded on a risk register and identified in the event of being called to that building. You could say the same for houses / garages / outbuildings but the risk there is less and it is quite common to come across bbq cylinders etc. aerosols make enough of a bang ! Cylinders with the exception of medical in a high rise building will be a bit more of a surprise and implementing a process to deal with them more problematic so advanced knowledge would be good. Try not to hide them out of easy sight , like under the spare bed (you’d be amazed) in the main cupboard with other dive kit will suffice. Ensure you have smoke / fire detection adequately throughout , the fire brigade will happily visit and fit alarms for free.

  2. #12
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    To expand this a little, are there any things that we should think about with diving tins, say in an attached garage?

    What happens to tins that are caught in a fire? Do they explode? (I expect they would given an intense fire) Should we have them stored closer to the garage door? Mine seem to have bred into a small family of about 20 including a twinset and stage with 100%

  3. #13
    Gone diving back later Vanny's Avatar
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    Ideally in the garage not the house. Never had a dive cylinder involved in a fire but heated enough , particularly if fully filled at a given temperature they will fail. I’m sure if you google cylinder involved in fire , you’ll find some examples of things going bang. Typical bbq type cylinders have an over pressurization valve and when heated should be able to vent. It’s not uncommon for the venting gas to ignite.
    If you were unfortunate enough to have a fire explain as soon as possible that the cylinders are there. If they are not involved the fire service will normally try to remove them to a safe distance. If they are involved and there is no risk to life , Ie your families not in there expect the fire brigade to stand a long way back and squirt water from a distance until the cylinders are deemed cool. This can be hours so unfortunately expect your house and contents to drown / burn.

    I guess if it’s a concern to you reduce the number and or move them to a stand alone storage place - shed etc.

    Again detection will identify a fire as early as poss so adequate alarms. To go totally fire brigade on You - call the fire brigade! - plan your escape route , keep routes clear and don’t hide the door keys. Make sure everyone in the house knows the plan, play it out with kids. If you couldn’t get out get everyone in one room , ideally facing where the brigade will pull-up , open the window and block smoke from getting in around the door - bedding clothes etc.
    Last edited by Vanny; 10-11-2020 at 05:59 PM.

  4. #14
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    A risk is an O2 leak from a pillar valve, that would create an O2 rich environment that could be ignited by a spark. So, you could use a valve plug on any rich O2 mix. This would do two things; firstly it would stop any leak from a faulty pillar valve and secondly by having to depressurise that plug it would alert you to the leak.

  5. #15
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    May be wrong but I took the OP to refer to O2 cylinders not because the have O2 but because that is what the neighbor reported they were storing to the council. I think they just standard scuba cylinders.

    Graham

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    The twinset with the O2 has Apeks valves as have some of my stages (modular valves for sidemounting). Not impressed with these valves as they’ve a tendency to leak if not tightened up enough. In fact I’m very disappointed with them as I’ve noticed this a couple or four times.

    Think I’ll add a note on the neck of the twinset to this effect. The boiler is in the garage!

    Hmm. Maybe those 35 plugs from Narked don’t seem that expensive now.

  7. #17
    Coastal Member dwhitlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bottle maker View Post
    May be wrong but I took the OP to refer to O2 cylinders not because the have O2 but because that is what the neighbor reported they were storing to the council. I think they just standard scuba cylinders.

    Graham
    Maybe so but there's always scope to invent problems that aren't real without actual facts. How else will the thread continue?

    If the OP doesn't clarify what has been reported, to whom, and what their response has been then there's nought left to do but invent theoretical scenarios and bring in the Internet insurance risk assessment team!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by dwhitlow View Post
    Maybe so but there's always scope to invent problems that aren't real without actual facts. How else will the thread continue?

    If the OP doesn't clarify what has been reported, to whom, and what their response has been then there's nought left to do but invent theoretical scenarios and bring in the Internet insurance risk assessment team!
    On the other hand, it’s good to have a reminder to think about the risks of storing O2 banking tins.

  9. #19
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    Cylinder storage at home / flat

    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisch View Post
    What sort of insurance? What insurance are you required to have?
    Afaik, no one requires you to have insurance while renting a flat, but if you would like to have, say contents insurance for all of your possessions, then the fact that you are storing diving cylinders in the flat may become an issue when getting a quote. I am aware of at least one insurance company over here who will not offer home insurance if diving cylinders of air let alone any O2, are stored on the premises.
    Last edited by cathal; 11-11-2020 at 10:02 AM.

  10. #20
    Established TDF Member Chrisch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cathal View Post
    Afaik, no ne requires you to have insurance while renting a flat, but if you would like to have, say contents insurance for all of your possessions, then the fact that you are storing diving cylinders in the flat may become an issue when getting a quote. I am aware of at least one insurance company over here who will not offer home insurance if diving cylinders of air let alone any O2, are stored on the premises.
    Fair enough. I was thinking mostly of third party risk to be honest. I cannot see how a scuba tank would change contents but that is insurance companies for you. Knobs. The leaseholder could have some third party liability to the freeholder and other flats leaseholders of course, but then the sub let tenant would be "responsible". What a mess. Thank goodness scuba tanks are not dangerous.


 
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