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Thread: Stainless bp

  1. #11
    Coastal Member dwhitlow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpj View Post
    The end of the thread on the bands has to be flush with the back-plate so you have to use mushroom bolts and not wingnuts.
    The holes are bigger to accommodate the bolts.
    I have a CD plate with an OMS wing, works for me with twins.
    Oh yes! I'd forgotten that detail as I got shot of mine 10 years ago when I offloaded my twinsets.

  2. #12
    TDF Member Rick07's Avatar
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    Hi just been looking at backplate and wondered what is the difference between
    304 and 316 stainless steel

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick07 View Post
    Hi just been looking at backplate and wondered what is the difference between
    304 and 316 stainless steel
    They're two different grades (or "families" of steel grades) of stainless steel. 316 is more corrosion resistant than 304. It is also more expensive. If you're going to use the plate in the sea with a bit of rough handling, using all sorts of low grade stainless bolts and never really wash it off, 316 is more likely to resist corrosion than 304 is.
    The views expressed are my own, worth what you've paid for them, are not on behalf of anyone else and not those of any company I work for etc.

  4. #14
    Established TDF Member MikeF's Avatar
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    304 is used for pans and interior applications. 316 has molybdenum added which increases corrosion resistance in the presence of sodium chloride. I’ll leave it to you to decide which is the better material to dip in saltwater.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeF View Post
    304 is used for pans and interior applications. 316 has molybdenum added which increases corrosion resistance in the presence of sodium chloride. I’ll leave it to you to decide which is the better material to dip in saltwater.
    I had some plates made in Philippines out of 316 - all the other plates I brought to show him (from major manufacturers) were 304 ... whilst 316 is superior it may not be necessary and indeed this was 10years ago and maybe people are using 316 these days

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by graham_hk View Post
    I had some plates made in Philippines out of 316 - all the other plates I brought to show him (from major manufacturers) were 304 ... whilst 316 is superior it may not be necessary and indeed this was 10years ago and maybe people are using 316 these days
    I think a lot still are 304. I'd check but I don't have access to a XRF tester any more and none come with mill certs. Rinky dink...! But I think you're right to a certain extent. If the plate is kept pretty clean and salt-free and the bolts/fittings/any other metallic contacting part are of a similar grade or better, 304 should ok for "normal" recreational diver use in the short to medium term. Probably. Properly prepared 316 hardware with A4 bolts almost certainly will be fine for life.
    The views expressed are my own, worth what you've paid for them, are not on behalf of anyone else and not those of any company I work for etc.

  7. #17
    Established TDF Member Steve Clark's Avatar
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    The halcyon plate is 304, polished. I've never seen one with any rust on it.

  8. #18
    Sorry for being a dick jb2cool's Avatar
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    Waits patiently for the comment about quarry diving

  9. #19
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    I've got a 316 stainless plate here spare. £40

    But fwiw, 304 will be right, it's only a glorified backpack ffs.
    Salt won't attack 304 when it's dry. It will probably discolour it where the soggy wing material is left in contact with the metal.

  10. #20
    Octopus Ink Team gpj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeF View Post
    304 is used for pans and interior applications. 316 has molybdenum added which increases corrosion resistance in the presence of sodium chloride. I’ll leave it to you to decide which is the better material to dip in saltwater.
    Yep,
    304 will stain but won't rust, 316 was originally developed for the nuclear industry with the added bonus that it was ideal for marine grade uses. If you get any staining it will be from ferritic stainless (430) or mild steels on your wing/harness attachments. Both 304 & 316 will last forever as long as you rinse in fresh water and dry, as you'd do with all your dive kit (ahem).
    Find us on FB - Casnewydd Scuba.


 
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