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  1. #41
    Established TDF Member Chrisch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greatwhite View Post
    How much does it cost to rent tanks for a day now?
    NDAC is £8.00 (inc the fill) For some reason your LDS (Dive 90) want 20 quid.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisch View Post
    NDAC is £8.00 (inc the fill) For some reason your LDS (Dive 90) want 20 quid.
    £20 is crazy. However, dive90 charge £10 to hire a bcd, at NDAC the sea quest centre charged me £20.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by UnCheeky Monkey View Post
    nothing is secure if its outside


    simple as that

    I have one of these - "secure and convenient" apparently



    Its used for storing fire wood in now

    the big padlock hoops and big padlocks I fitted to them were still there long after the bike was gone ....
    Do people steal diving tanks? I know if anything is outside it is more likely to go missing, but at the same time I try and make it a little more difficult for them.

  4. #44
    Established TDF Member steelemonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greatwhite View Post
    Do people steal diving tanks? I know if anything is outside it is more likely to go missing, but at the same time I try and make it a little more difficult for them.
    Tanks = scrap metal, if nothing else.
    Paul.
    If God had meant us to breathe underwater, he would have given us larger bank balances.
    Human beings were invented by water as a means of moving itself from one place to another.

  5. #45
    Established TDF Member Nickpicks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by steelemonkey View Post
    Tanks = scrap metal, if nothing else.
    My local scrap metal dealer wouldn't take one when it had a rusty bottom (he may have been confused with the rule that they can't take drinks company or BOC ones).

    I had to drop it in the metal recycling container at the local tip.
    The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.

  6. #46
    TDF Member JasminNeedsGills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by graham_hk View Post
    Yes I never understood the British obsession with having their own tanks ... heavy and bulky to move around and expensive to own unless you're doing a-lot of diving (1 day per month on twins cost you more than £10 per day to keep in service etc etc)
    British diving started off as club diving. Well in the 90s, BSAC was absolutely dominant in the UK scene - you started off with the crappy club gear, and once you got carded you brought you own kit, filled your tanks ("Cylinders!" - as my instructor always corrected me) using the club compressor, and went out on the club RIB. The idea of hard boats with hot drinks and toilets, and shops hiring kit was some weird stuff those foreign types did. Times have moved on, but the focus on owning your own tanks has stayed, especially as the decline of BSAC hasn't led to more med/red style dive centres, it's just meant few facilities all around. If anything, having your own kit these days is even more essential than it was before. The only way I'd say you could avoid it would be if you exlucsively dive on holiday, or if you are *very* lucky and have a club that maintains a decent cylinder bank of it's own (which outside of university and military clubs, isn't the norm by any stretch of the imagination).
    Exeter - Falmouth University BSAC #2551
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  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasminNeedsGills View Post
    British diving started off as club diving. Well in the 90s, BSAC was absolutely dominant in the UK scene - you started off with the crappy club gear, and once you got carded you brought you own kit, filled your tanks ("Cylinders!" - as my instructor always corrected me) using the club compressor, and went out on the club RIB. The idea of hard boats with hot drinks and toilets, and shops hiring kit was some weird stuff those foreign types did. Times have moved on, but the focus on owning your own tanks has stayed, especially as the decline of BSAC hasn't led to more med/red style dive centres, it's just meant few facilities all around. If anything, having your own kit these days is even more essential than it was before. The only way I'd say you could avoid it would be if you exlucsively dive on holiday, or if you are *very* lucky and have a club that maintains a decent cylinder bank of it's own (which outside of university and military clubs, isn't the norm by any stretch of the imagination).
    The hard part for any organisation looking at renting tanks is getting to the point where money invested (tank purchase, testing, compressor operation and maintenance, storage space etc) is less than money generated (by hires, use in classes etc). When looking at tank costs for a business/club over a few years (£120-150 to buy, £100-150 testing, compressor costs £3-5 per fill) as well as incidental costs such as new valves (rentals WILL get damaged valves), repainting/labelling etc it becomes quite an investment to get a return on. Commercial shops that are doing training do this by incorporating hire costs in the training cost but clubs can't really do it (most don't have the funds to cover the capital outlay to cover more than a handful of "club tanks"). Clubs such as uni and military can often manage it due to subsidies & grants which might not be available to other bodies.

  8. #48
    Established TDF Member Energy58's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neilwood View Post
    The hard part for any organisation looking at renting tanks is getting to the point where money invested (tank purchase, testing, compressor operation and maintenance, storage space etc) is less than money generated (by hires, use in classes etc). When looking at tank costs for a business/club over a few years (£120-150 to buy, £100-150 testing, compressor costs £3-5 per fill) as well as incidental costs such as new valves (rentals WILL get damaged valves), repainting/labelling etc it becomes quite an investment to get a return on. Commercial shops that are doing training do this by incorporating hire costs in the training cost but clubs can't really do it (most don't have the funds to cover the capital outlay to cover more than a handful of "club tanks"). Clubs such as uni and military can often manage it due to subsidies & grants which might not be available to other bodies.
    Tool hire firms work on about 20% of capital cost/hire - they also make a fair bit from consumables - ski hire is similar; which makes £20 for a cylinder hire sound about right.

    Over say 5 years owning a cylinder is going to cost you about £300 and you can probably get £70-£100 back at the end - so it is only worth hiring if you dive less than 3 times a year at these rates; £10 a hire doubles that. Most divers will easily pass that which is why almost no one hires as a stand alone business except in places where the divers are all tourists or can't bring cylinders for some other reason - like they live in a flat with no room to store them.
    Last edited by Energy58; 04-02-2020 at 02:22 PM.

  9. #49
    Like a real diver but smaller apparently purple vonny's Avatar
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    My maths is crap but I got 2 x 10l cylinders new in 2005 for £300. Before that I had some dirt cheap ex-dive school cylinders for £15 each.. Doing 50 odd dives a year with some free fills (good friends and work stuff) and some £3-£4 fills since I stopped instructing, I think it worked out cheaper than renting. I've stopped getting them 02 tested because if I need Nitrox, I need 12 litre or 15 litre cylinders and these are in the shed. That's another calculation. I now live by the sea and that means if the weather is good, and I have a day off, I'm going diving. Full cylinder ready to go in the shed all the time. If I rented a cylinder every dive over 15 years at £10 or even £5 per dive day I'd be over 3 grand poorer.

    I have a padlock on the shed door but have also kept them outside. If you think you will tire quickly of diving and won't get your money's worth, rent the buggers. Otherwise, if you are mad keen and will be mad keen for years to come, buy some. I can't see a problem with storing them outside in the back garden if they are well hidden and you don't have a fancy rich looking house.
    I bet I get bloody burgled now.

    OK my sums might be crap, but if you dive a lot, get some cylinders. Keep them outside if you need to.
    Last edited by purple vonny; 04-02-2020 at 05:23 PM.

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrisch View Post
    I agree, but my tanks always seem to need it and it would be silly to suggest that the tank testers are just trying to run the bill up wouldn't it?
    You could allus remove a valve or two yourself first and have a look, then if they say a tank that was perfectly clean needs blasting then you know exactly whose bollocks to go kick


 
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