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  1. #21
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    Tips from the professional photographer on our cruise about how to photograph the aurora

    1. Use a very high ISO
    2. Use maximum aperture
    3. Don't use too long an exposure. My shot was 1 second. The aurora is a moving entity and if you use a very long exposure, while you might capture more light you lose all the shape.
    4. Of course you need some way of stabilising your camera. If using a monopod on a ship, stand it on your foot to reduce the vibration. I stabilised my camera on the ship's rail but used a folded towel to dampen the vibration. I tried it with and without the towel and it did make a difference.

    You see far more colour in photos than you can with the naked eye. With the naked eye, the aurora was very pale green, almost white.

  2. #22
    Established TDF Member steelemonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Carr View Post
    Tips from the professional photographer on our cruise about how to photograph the aurora

    1. Use a very high ISO
    2. Use maximum aperture
    3. Don't use too long an exposure. My shot was 1 second. The aurora is a moving entity and if you use a very long exposure, while you might capture more light you lose all the shape.
    4. Of course you need some way of stabilising your camera. If using a monopod on a ship, stand it on your foot to reduce the vibration. I stabilised my camera on the ship's rail but used a folded towel to dampen the vibration. I tried it with and without the towel and it did make a difference.

    You see far more colour in photos than you can with the naked eye. With the naked eye, the aurora was very pale green, almost white.
    Thanks Allan. That is really useful to know if I ever get back there. I was planning on using my Fuji finepix to take videos.
    Paul.
    If God had meant us to breathe underwater, he would have given us larger bank balances.
    Human beings were invented by water as a means of moving itself from one place to another.

  3. #23
    Hail the Children of LLyr
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Carr View Post
    Interestingly, the photos are more spectacular than what you can see with the naked eye.


    Perhaps because it's a "forbidden sight"


    Sorry, I'll get me coat
    "...are we human, or are we diver?"

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Carr View Post
    Tips from the professional photographer on our cruise about how to photograph the aurora

    1. Use a very high ISO
    2. Use maximum aperture
    3. Don't use too long an exposure. My shot was 1 second. The aurora is a moving entity and if you use a very long exposure, while you might capture more light you lose all the shape.
    4. Of course you need some way of stabilising your camera. If using a monopod on a ship, stand it on your foot to reduce the vibration. I stabilised my camera on the ship's rail but used a folded towel to dampen the vibration. I tried it with and without the towel and it did make a difference.

    You see far more colour in photos than you can with the naked eye. With the naked eye, the aurora was very pale green, almost white.
    A cheap and easy monopod for anyone that doesn't want the weight or has forgotten their own one on a trip is a suitably sized bolt (or eye bolt if available) with a length of string (length is not really a problem but it needs to be at least a foot longer than your height as a minimum). Create a small loop around the bolt (using a washer if needed to hold it). The other end gets a larger loop which you insert your foot into. You adjust the height so that it is long enough to brace the camera with your arms but short enough to provide a bit of tension. Link


 
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