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  1. #1
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    Seven Worlds, One Planet - what could go wrong!

    Another amazing natural history production - they just seem to go on getting better and better. There is an article on the BBC website about what could go wrong in making a natural history documentary. Scan down to the bit about manatees - hilarious!

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zf7n6v4

  2. #2
    Not short, just concentrated awesome ;) smileydiver's Avatar
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    Looking forward to watching it later
    The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever - Jacques Cousteau

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    It really is superb. Some absolutely astounding footage and beautiful underwater shots. I would have loved to have dived Antarctica when we were there last year but the expedition staff on our ship, several of whom had worked on the Antarctic research stations said that the commercial dive trips really aren't worth it because they only dive around the edges which are scoured by the ice during the winter. The footage in Seven Worlds, One Planet was obviously filmed from holes in the permanent sea ice where the bottom is not subject to the scouring. Unfortunately unless you join the British Antarctic Survey you are unlikely to get the chance to do this.

    That shot of the manatee reminded me that on our trip to Antarctica we were told that we should stay at least 5 metres away from all the wildlife. However nobody had told the penguins that and they crowded around us, pulling at the toggles on out parkas, pecking at my wife's stick and walking between our legs!

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    Amazing footage as expected from BBC natural history.

    Every time I see a new series, the bar seems to get lifted by a huge amount.

  5. #5
    I still don't have a member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allan Carr View Post
    It really is superb. Some absolutely astounding footage and beautiful underwater shots. I would have loved to have dived Antarctica when we were there last year but the expedition staff on our ship, several of whom had worked on the Antarctic research stations said that the commercial dive trips really aren't worth it because they only dive around the edges which are scoured by the ice during the winter. The footage in Seven Worlds, One Planet was obviously filmed from holes in the permanent sea ice where the bottom is not subject to the scouring. Unfortunately unless you join the British Antarctic Survey you are unlikely to get the chance to do this.

    That shot of the manatee reminded me that on our trip to Antarctica we were told that we should stay at least 5 metres away from all the wildlife. However nobody had told the penguins that and they crowded around us, pulling at the toggles on out parkas, pecking at my wife's stick and walking between our legs!
    Yes the penguins have not read that rule book. That was my experience when we visited. The Japanese travellers totally ignored all safety briefings and thought selfies in front of a Bull Fur seal was entirely appropriate it was voicing its displeasure very loudly. With hindsight I wish one of them had been bitten as they had zero respect for the environment they were visiting. I never did the diving I was booked to do but yes they only dive round the edges . OH did say they saw similar areas of starfish, the huge white worms and urchins in re-colonised areas. Watching that brought back brilliant memories. We were incredibly privileged to witness a large pod of Orcas hunting a whale larger than themselves. They worked as a group to hold said whale underwater until it drowned. Once dead they started feeding on it, as was said at the time that was something the film makers might spend months trying to capture!!
    A fully paid up member of the CRAFT Club

    I failed to dive in Antartica
    I used to have a handle on life but it broke

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    We had a fantastic whale sighting too. A Fin Whale appeared, then a pod of three Humpbacks, then a pod of Orcas. The Humpbacks turned and swam under the ship so I've got a photo looking straight down the blowhole of one of the whales. They were around us for about 20 minutes. The captain had stopped the ship and was leaning over the side along with virtually everyone else on board. He said he had never known whales come so close to the ship, let alone swim under it.

    On another day, five Zodiacs were out touring along a glacier when a call came over the radio that a humpback had been sighted. The Zodiacs were located in a circle when a humpback stuck it's head up in the middle of the circle, probably no more than 20-30 feet away from the boats. The guy driving the Zodiac said that was the closest encounter he had ever had with a humpback - and the closest he ever wanted! Unfortunately, I didn't get any decent photos of that encounter because we had a very excitable American woman on our Zodiac on the side between me and the whale and she was jumping up and down, shrieking and waving her arms around frantically. She came very close to having an unexpected swim with a bit of encouragement from the rest of the passengers.


 

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