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  1. #1
    I used to be Cheeky UnCheeky Monkey's Avatar
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    Back up and store photos on DVD ?

    A quick Q which someone on here might already know the answer to

    I've got loads of photos - too many, going back years, all a bit of a jumble. A mix of go pro, cameras, phones etc.

    I'm trying to find time to delete duplicates, organise a bit better, get rid of junk, and think properly about long term storage

    At the moment, I have a RAID array in my PC with mirrored hard drives, and my photos are in a OneDrive folder, so I've sort of got hard drive failure and fire/theft taken care of as short term back up goes

    I've got a pile of blank DVDs

    Would back up to DVD be worth doing ?

    Do DVDs degrade over time ?

    Can they be password protected or anything of that sort ?

    Or should I just chuck them out ?

    I know they are only small (remember when 4.7GB seemed a lot ?) but I wondered about burning folders or years or something to them as I get stuff sorted out a bit better and then putting them away off site somewhere

    Any thoughts ?

    [EDIT - just found a large stack of unused Maxell CD-R discs too ! Guess they are not much use for anything any more ?]

  2. #2
    Established TDF Member Decosnapper's Avatar
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    There is an entire discipline devoted to image management...have a look at The DAM Book by Peter Krogh. In another life I used to teach the methodology...and I do know at least two photographers are using at least some of what I taught to this day - used correctly the methods work. I have 220k images in the library now (photogrammetry creates data at an alarming rate...2500 images on one dive is not unusual) but know I can find the one I want in seconds.

    Backup is an altogether different subject.

    I use external offsite HDD for longterm storage. Its the only format that has persisted since the birth of the PC and IDE or SATA interfaces are well embedded now.

    HDDs can be encrypted too. RW DVDs I do not use as I have heard they can degrade over time, but I cannot vouch for that...it might just be a rumour.

    Online backup still has restrictions and limits as the speed of broadband just never quite overtakes the RAW file size.

  3. #3
    Supergnu Jen - Winged Blob's Avatar
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    I've gone for the lo-tech option for my more long-term stuff. Files already stored on DVD I'm copying onto an external hard drive which I'll keep - the DVDs will be sent off to a mate's cellar. Files newer than DVD will be saved onto two hard drives - the one which I'll keep and one for the cellar. I've got a mirrored NAS set-up for current data and I don't want the complication/cost of cloud back-up.

    Eventually I'll have worked backwards to my roll film negatives - I'll be seeking recommendations for a way to transfer those (and my Dad's ancient slides) into an electronic format, but that's maybe for another thread.

  4. #4
    Gimme a medal BenL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jen - Winged Blob View Post
    Eventually I'll have worked backwards to my roll film negatives - I'll be seeking recommendations for a way to transfer those (and my Dad's ancient slides) into an electronic format, but that's maybe for another thread.
    This is a thread I'd be interested in! Looking to archive a load of of my late father's slides and prints from his 1960s/70s spearfishing days, and to digitize a bunch of dive mags (Triton etc) for posterity.
    I don't want to get technical or anything, but alcohol IS a solution

  5. #5
    Established TDF Member jamesp's Avatar
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    Some years ago I went to a talk on digital archiving of engineering data; in particular they were looking at aviation, where records of manufacture and service at component level have to kept for the service life of the aircraft model, plus 50years iirc.

    DVDs where a no-no, solid state memory was also a no-no, it was still a problem, as how many formats had existed in the life of just say a 747; and you needed to have one that could still be read in ~80 years time.


    If that sounds far fetched, someone was dumping 80~100kgs of Microfiche found in a store room at Airbus Broughton last year.

    Turned out to be the full set of drawings for every marque of the Mosquito ever designed or built.

    There is a group building a replica who were more than a little happy to take ownership of them.

  6. #6
    Established TDF Member Energy58's Avatar
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    About 10 years ago I did a big clear up and put all my photos onto about 60 DVD and thought I was covered. Then this year I suddenly realised that the only thing I had that could read DVD was a 10 year old obsolescent laptop so I transferred them all to a stand alone 1 TB HDD and made a back up copy of that on a second HDD - which took an absolute age. Hopefully that covers me for a few years and I can easily copy the HDD onto whatever comes next but DVD are clearly old technology and speed restrictions limit the use of cloud storage - digital films are distributed via encrypted HDD which are sent around by courier and only the key is emailed which controls how/when/where they can be played for exactly this reason. So I would buy a couple of big good quality external HDD for back up and chuck the DVDs in the bin or use them as coasters.

  7. #7
    Established TDF Member Nickpicks's Avatar
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    I've had a few recordable DVDs where the silver has flaked off after about 5-10 years (not even stored in a particularly damp/cold/hot location), so I'd be concerned about using dvd as a long term archive.

    HDDs seem to be OK (but make at least 2 copies just in case)
    The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.

  8. #8
    I used to be Cheeky UnCheeky Monkey's Avatar
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    Thanks all

  9. #9
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    Personally I would go for HDD for long term storage. The information on the platter will often survive longer than the drive motor (and can be recovered at a cost).

    Even with an older HDD, it is normally possible to access the information with adaptors etc.

    For critical storage, have 2 independent backups (with one preferably off site). For personal stuff, one can be enough but give a thought as to how to save it from damage in the event of fire/water damage.


 

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