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  1. #1
    Established TDF Member Nickpicks's Avatar
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    Cutting Webbing to length

    What's the best way to cut the harness webbing to the right length?

    When I first assembled the harness, I left it long but I cut it with shears, then used a small blowtorch to melt the ends to stop it fraying.
    This left a few bobbles which tend to catch on the edges as I'm threading it through the buckle.

    I was thinking that the ideal tool would be a hot knife to cut and seal, but the electric ones are quite expensive.
    So my next thought was to buy a cheap kitchen knife, heat it on the gas hob and use that.

    Any advice on the best method of cutting webbing to get a smooth cut?
    The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.

  2. #2
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    I use a gas soldering iron. They are about 25-30 with several tips: soldering, flame, hot air, and most importantly for this question, a hot-knife tip. It gets used a fair bit, particularly the hot knife bit though it's also my main (and only) soldering iron too.

    It's a lot easier than the burny finger method of cutting with a shears or stantley knife then tidying up with a red hot kitchen knife after. If you are reduced to this, handy hint is a small bowl of cold water to dip your fingers in when they get coated in molten plastic

  3. #3
    Established TDF Member Nickpicks's Avatar
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    Ooh, I think my (rarely used and probably split) gas soldering iron has a V shaped knife tip! I'd forgotten about that.
    The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.

  4. #4
    Octopus Ink Team gpj's Avatar
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    Keep it simple, I use a scissors to cut and a quick flash over with a cigarette lighter and flatten the cut while still hot with the side of the scissor blade. You could always ask a grown up to help (blue peter mode )
    Find us on FB - Casnewydd Scuba.

  5. #5
    Established TDF Member Nickpicks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gpj View Post
    Keep it simple, I use a scissors to cut and a quick flash over with a cigarette lighter and flatten the cut while still hot with the side of the scissor blade. You could always ask a grown up to help (blue peter mode )
    I think I was a bit slow with the 'flattening the cut' bit, so the molten blobs went solid before I tried flattening them.
    The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.

  6. #6
    Prior Member Tim Digger's Avatar
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    In our kitchen draw lives a very knackered tarnished blunt table knife used for just this purpose. With a gas cooker.
    Evolution is great at solving problems. It's the methods that concern me.
    Tim Digger

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickpicks View Post
    Any advice on the best method of cutting webbing to get a smooth cut?
    I just use MrsT's heavy duty sowing scissors then slightly melt the end with a lighter. I've found it doesn't need to be totally melted to not fray and it won't form bubbles/globules if you only slightly melt it. Squishing the globules if they do form (or cutting them off) worked for me.

  8. #8
    Established TDF Member bubbleless's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jturner View Post
    I just use MrsT's heavy duty sowing scissors then slightly melt the end with a lighter. I've found it doesn't need to be totally melted to not fray and it won't form bubbles/globules if you only slightly melt it. Squishing the globules if they do form (or cutting them off) worked for me.
    This is what I do.. works well.
    I lick my fingers and seal with wet fingers..... be careful, melted nylon can stick and burn...
    No special tools needed

  9. #9
    Established TDF Member Tel's Avatar
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    Cut the webbing straight with decent sharp scissors, then trim the corners at 45 degrees before using a lighter.

    Less chance of a blob of melt forming on the right angles then, so no need to resort to burnt skin + it's way easier
    to thread


 

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