Hello and welcome to our community! Is this your first visit?
Register
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: Equalisation

  1. #11
    Prior Member Tim Digger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    West Midlands UK
    Posts
    3,549
    Likes (Given)
    2211
    Likes (Received)
    2632
    My advice. Just wait. Try gentle equalisation manoeuvres on surface. Give it another week before seeking dive medical help. Try sleeping with right ear uppermost! Especially if you don't normally do this.
    We doctors have difficulty admitting failure, it may be difficult to visualise your ear drum. Do not dive or swim before seeing a dive doctor or ENT specialist.
    Do you have a lopsided smile? Now, not normally.
    Evolution is great at solving problems. It's the methods that concern me.
    Tim Digger

  2. #12
    TDF Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Wilts
    Posts
    52
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Digger View Post
    We doctors have difficulty admitting failure, it may be difficult to visualise your ear drum. Do not dive or swim before seeing a dive doctor or ENT specialist.
    Do you have a lopsided smile? Now, not normally.

    Can't say I have a lopsided smile, but do feel like the right hand of my face is more 'down' than the left hand side. Even wearing headphones (over-ear ones) listening to music now I have to equalise every 10-15 seconds otherwise it feels like a vacumn or too much pressure, can't tell which way. Whenever I try and blow out my nose, some air seems to find it's way into my ear, or so it feels.


    I wont be doing anything near water for the next 4-6 weeks at minimum. I work within the aviation industry and some (soon to be a lot) of my time is spent at altitude, so I don't want to kaput the career aspirations too.

  3. #13
    Self Defecating The Real Paulus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Fylde Coast
    Posts
    1,799
    Likes (Given)
    2116
    Likes (Received)
    744
    I used to really struggle when flying, or on descent anyway. Absolute agony and deaf for the first 2 days of holiday. I couldn't "pop" my ears no matter how I tried.

    So when I learned to dive I struggled like hell to equalize. A combination of poor technique (perhaps?) and a crooked right eustachian tube (perhaps?). I hurt my ears a good few times early on.
    I eventually developed my own "crick neck + valsalva" technique. I also started gently "pre-inflating" my ears before rolling in then equalising early and often and now do the same on flying descents. Other passengers might look and think I'm turning into a turtle or something, the way I have to contort my neck...

    I'm still very sensitive to pressure on my ears but don't suffer injury and only have the usual marital deafness.

  4. #14
    Prior Member Tim Digger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    West Midlands UK
    Posts
    3,549
    Likes (Given)
    2211
    Likes (Received)
    2632
    Agree completely for pre inflation. Equalisation immediately prior to descent. Helps many with difficulty with equilisation.
    Now I understand your very real concerns. Re job and altitude. Although pressure changes in air are slower and more easy to cope with usually. You are right in wanting to get it checked asap. Although I still hope time will sort it.
    Best wishes
    Evolution is great at solving problems. It's the methods that concern me.
    Tim Digger

  5. #15
    TDF Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Wilts
    Posts
    52
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4
    Booked in with one of the Dive Medical Council referee's for 23rd Jan. Plenty of questions answered over the phone - so she'll have a closer look then. I think the recent dull ache was associated with some jaw popping and cracking, I don't know how that would affect my inner ear, however.

    One side - I have to equalise every 5 seconds when I listen to music through my over-ear headphones, though. Hm? Odd. Plus, when I breath through my nose in the way as if I'm about to yawn, I can feel as if my ear goes in and out with the incoming and escaping ear out of my nose. Odd.

  6. #16
    Prior Member Tim Digger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    West Midlands UK
    Posts
    3,549
    Likes (Given)
    2211
    Likes (Received)
    2632
    Quote Originally Posted by Tango Charlie View Post
    Booked in with one of the Dive Medical Council referee's for 23rd Jan. Plenty of questions answered over the phone - so she'll have a closer look then. I think the recent dull ache was associated with some jaw popping and cracking, I don't know how that would affect my inner ear, however.

    One side - I have to equalise every 5 seconds when I listen to music through my over-ear headphones, though. Hm? Odd. Plus, when I breath through my nose in the way as if I'm about to yawn, I can feel as if my ear goes in and out with the incoming and escaping ear out of my nose. Odd.
    Good.
    Just a bit of semantics so you are on the same wavelength as your doc. The OUTER or EXTERNAL ear is the bit sticking out and the canal going in as far as the Ear drum, the MIDDLE ear is the "normally" air filled cavity inside the bone of the base of the skull which air gets to from the back of the nose through the Eustachian tube, it contains the ossicles (three small bones that act as a amplifier and volume control for sound vibrations coming from the Ear Drum) and AIR, these connect via the Oval Window to the INNER Ear which consists of the cochlear and semicircular canals, the former is hearing via hair cells the latter is balance. The damage in question with barotrauma is usually in the middle ear as I said before with a classic middle ear barotrauma the middle ear cavity fills with fluid and the membranes lining it become swollen, just like a bruise this will take time to settle. If there is anything else. There is nothing that time waiting will hurt.
    Time heals Let us know. Don't get in water until you see the doctor.

    You probably don't need to equalise quite that often, because of the fluid damping the movements of the ossicles and ear drum down it just feels that way. Imagine trying to hear with your ear canal full of jelly that's where you are now.
    Last edited by Tim Digger; 09-01-2019 at 08:09 PM.
    Evolution is great at solving problems. It's the methods that concern me.
    Tim Digger

  7. #17
    Established TDF Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    NW UK
    Posts
    1,203
    Likes (Given)
    258
    Likes (Received)
    430
    In the past when I've had "odd" ear things like squeaky popping noises when equalising (usually to do with a cold, rather than diving) I've used some vicks decongestant spray which has helped considerably. I don't know if there would be any down sides to trying a bit of this.


 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •