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  1. #1
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    Am I being paranoid

    I have always worn my deep bailout second stage necklaced, despite having a BOV.

    This has several positive attributes incl. making it easy to switch to if the BOV is compromised for example by caustic fluid, deep tank ID is easy to correct before the dive and less risk of damage or pinning by a tank on top of it.

    That said it does inc. clutter in the already busy chest/throat area, it's easy to catch it and induce a purge either on the boat or while reaching/accessing other gear, and very difficult to hand off if ever required.

    I am relatively comfortable that the switch and ID issue can be trained for so the main reason for having it is as an emergency bail out if the BOV failed or was full of caustic.

    I test the BOV on every dive so the latter is more likely, but what sort of incidence level does this have.

    I know it has happened to Barry and I think also to Mark and it crops up fairly frequently on RBW but mainly in aged threads so wondering if the incidence level has decreased with better awareness and preparation.

  2. #2
    Established TDF Member OutOfTest's Avatar
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    Am I being paranoid

    Just keep it there. I wear two there every dive on CCR.

    Youíre currently thinking of removing an inconvenience by making an emergency deployment more difficult.

    That doesnít seem very clever to me.

    Why not train to overcome the inconveniences rather than training harder for emergencies?

    PS: if you ever want to see the design for a necklace that is easy to hand off in an emergency, let me know. I imagine youíre bungeeing like a normal back up regulator?


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    Quote Originally Posted by OutOfTest View Post

    PS: if you ever want to see the design for a necklace that is easy to hand off in an emergency, let me know. I imagine youíre bungeeing like a normal back up regulator?


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    I for one would definitely be interested in seeing that

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    Established TDF Member OutOfTest's Avatar
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    Am I being paranoid

    Quote Originally Posted by MinimalMayhem View Post
    I for one would definitely be interested in seeing that


    Zip ties on hoses next to regs and youíre sorted.

    On CCR to hand off you just unclip, feed up one side of head inside the loop and down the other.

    Seems a faff, but you get ridiculously used to it. Takes less than a second for me now.

    I do this at least 4 times a dive, twice when gearing up, twice when taking gear off. More if Iím changing deep bailout underground or squeezing through small gaps.

    Also do it at least 4 times a dive on OC...hey! Another reason to have consistent approaches regardless of primary breathing device....



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    I am very much in 2 minds about it Ash, but as the colder weather and water arrives there is an increased risk of freeflow if/when I catch the reg underwater, bailout gets diminished every time I catch it in or out of the water and it increases the faff during prep, and clutter during the dive, both if which if removed can improve stress levels and therefore IMHO safety.

    That said it is very comforting to know the reg is a spit away and I could fit a bungee over the purge I guess, which would add a step but it would still be shorter than a full deployment from a stage.

    I have seen other designs of breakaway necklace involving small gauge o-rings that will snap under load, the o-ring is usually on the necklace and a regular bolt snap is on the reg in the style of a GUE primary, the snap attaches to the o-ring and can be pulled off in instant, but the snap means it can be re-stowed after.

    Again not as elegant and simple as a bungee under the mouthpiece zip tie, and reg hangs lower but solves the hand off issue.

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    Red Hot Totty ;) Hot Totty's Avatar
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    Iíve always left mine rigged on the bailout stage, never had an issue deploying and tbh if hypercapnia is setting in trying to remove anything from your mouth apparently is very problematic regardless how close your bail out reg is.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonG View Post
    I have always worn my deep bailout second stage necklaced, despite having a BOV.

    This has several positive attributes incl. making it easy to switch to if the BOV is compromised for example by caustic fluid, deep tank ID is easy to correct before the dive and less risk of damage or pinning by a tank on top of it.

    That said it does inc. clutter in the already busy chest/throat area, it's easy to catch it and induce a purge either on the boat or while reaching/accessing other gear, and very difficult to hand off if ever required.

    I am relatively comfortable that the switch and ID issue can be trained for so the main reason for having it is as an emergency bail out if the BOV failed or was full of caustic.

    I test the BOV on every dive so the latter is more likely, but what sort of incidence level does this have.

    I know it has happened to Barry and I think also to Mark and it crops up fairly frequently on RBW but mainly in aged threads so wondering if the incidence level has decreased with better awareness and preparation.
    I guess for it would come down to what is more likely - that I'll need to bailout due to caustic cocktail and therefore need the stage's reg right to hand (even closer than usual), or I'd need to hand off the stage's reg to someone else/hand off the stage to someone else. My unit is quite fault tolerant and handed over half a pint of liquid in the loop without any hint of a caustic cocktail. I have removed stages underwater several times for various reasons though never needed to give anyone my regs. so I'd have all the time I'd need to remove the reg if I needed to.

    So, if the above situations are similar with your unit and if the reg is not bothering you, leave it be? YMMV. Mine's attached to the stage.

    PS I'm assuming your BOV is supplied from off-board?


 

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