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  1. #1
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    Manifolds and switching blocks

    Just curious to find out what people's thoughts are on the above, there are obvious pros and cons and differences between them.

    My unit came with a manifold designed to distribute 1 gas to multiple destinations, I am more thinking of a manifold or block for distributing 2 or more gases to multiple locations.

    This could include actual switching blocks designed for the purpose or simple tapped manifolds that could be connected to 1 or more gas sources relying on the tank valve as the point of isolation of each gas.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonG View Post
    Just curious to find out what people's thoughts are on the above, there are obvious pros and cons and differences between them.

    My unit came with a manifold designed to distribute 1 gas to multiple destinations, I am more thinking of a manifold or block for distributing 2 or more gases to multiple locations.

    This could include actual switching blocks designed for the purpose or simple tapped manifolds that could be connected to 1 or more gas sources relying on the tank valve as the point of isolation of each gas.
    I thought about it but decided against it, as I don't really need that level of functionality for the diving I'm doing especially for those once in 10 million days when you might need to muck around with gases to that degree, and unless I was very practised with it, I'd probably screw up.

  3. #3
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    I have played around with both many times. Largely to stop putting gas in wing or avoid refilling larger bailout bottles. I ultimately decided it was more hassle than its worth and a Haskel for topping up gas was better than trying to preserve it

  4. #4
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    Off topic sorry
    Last edited by Tewdric; 05-12-2018 at 04:49 AM.

  5. #5
    Old but keen Mark Chase's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonG View Post
    Just curious to find out what people's thoughts are on the above, there are obvious pros and cons and differences between them.

    My unit came with a manifold designed to distribute 1 gas to multiple destinations, I am more thinking of a manifold or block for distributing 2 or more gases to multiple locations.

    This could include actual switching blocks designed for the purpose or simple tapped manifolds that could be connected to 1 or more gas sources relying on the tank valve as the point of isolation of each gas.

    Manifolds = More failure points

    Switching blocks are an accident waiting to happen


    Switching blocks were popular when the concept of dill flushing and gas switching on ascent to minimise deco, was a thing we were doing / considering doing

    It out of fashon now and I dont see it coming back anytime soon


    Switching blocks are also a thing with PSCR units like the RB80 which is a hideous machine best put in the history books and forgoton

  6. #6
    Old but keen Mark Chase's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tewdric View Post
    I use switch blocks to feed a primary and backup air source to a full face mask. They are well established in commercial diving.
    Am I correct in thinking its switching between the same gas mix but from two different sources? in which case thats fine as theres no chance of a screw up

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Chase View Post
    Manifolds = More failure points

    Switching blocks are an accident waiting to happen


    Switching blocks were popular when the concept of dill flushing and gas switching on ascent to minimise deco, was a thing we were doing / considering doing

    It out of fashon now and I dont see it coming back anytime soon


    Switching blocks are also a thing with PSCR units like the RB80 which is a hideous machine best put in the history books and forgoton
    Amount of line laid by Mark Chase: 0 m ?

    Amount of line laid by RB80s: A lot...

    Wouldn't be so fast with the rubbish bin comment

  8. #8
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    No experience with any unit other than the rEvo. The rEvo MAV takes two different gases and puts it in the exhale lung. Very intuitive to use and easy to service. No issues so far after 6 years and none that I have read about in the forums. My 2C.

  9. #9
    Old but keen Mark Chase's Avatar
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    Line that would have been more efficiently laid using a CCR

    The RB80 was a solution looking for a problem

    I have discussed a French cave trip with two RB80 users (one a GUE instructor) and they both agreed it was a nightmare to use for multilevel French caving.

    They are inherently dangerous (which is ironic) which was demonstrated with the hypoxic incident well documented by GUE

    They are overly complex in terms of dive planning and execution and as one RB80 owner & different GUE instructor said to me, they breath like sucking honey through a straw

    I haven't dived a RB80 but I have dived a ED04 clone unit.

    You could argue that the RB80s offered a solution to unreliable electronics of the MK1 Inspo Classic, but we have moved on since 2000 and modern ECCR and MCCR units are now very reliable and many times more efficient and practical than the RB80

    A better question would be how many m of line have been laid by RB80s in the last five years?

    Not so many id bet.

    The RB80 is a thing of the past, and thank god for that.
    Last edited by Mark Chase; 02-12-2018 at 10:27 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Chase View Post
    Line that would have been more efficiently laid using a CCR

    The RB80 was a solution looking for a problem

    I have discussed a French cave trip with two RB80 users (one a GUE instructor) and they both agreed it was a nightmare to use for multilevel French caving.

    They are inherently dangerous (which is ironic) which was demonstrated with the hypoxic incident well documented by GUE

    They are overly complex in terms of dive planning and execution and as one RB80 owner & different GUE instructor said to me, they breath like sucking honey through a straw

    I haven't dived a RB80 but I have dived a ED04 clone unit.

    You could argue that the RB80s offered a solution to unreliable electronics of the MK1 Inspo Classic, but we have moved on since 2000 and modern ECCR and MCCR units are now very reliable and many times more efficient and practical than the RB80

    A better question would be how many m of line have been laid by RB80s in the last five years?

    Not so many id bet.

    The RB80 is a thing of the past, and thank god for that.
    I did a lot of diving with an rb80 - there are still people actively exploring with them. I have also done a lot on a MK15 (and 15.5) and inspirations since late 90s. I currently dive a JJ. But at the end of the day - who cares. Just pick a tool that you and your team are happy with and go out and have some fun diving (or bashing quarries if that's your thing).


 
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