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Thread: My dog

  1. #1
    Established TDF Member rockystock1's Avatar
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    My dog

    I have a 13 year old springer ( Abbie)who has been and still is a very good dog, although she is getting grumpy in her old age.

    And I also have a 3 year old little girl (Isabella) who is very very active n playfull.,

    Abbie has never took to Isabella since she was born, if Isabella's downstairs Abbie upstairs. Abbie avoids Isabella like the plague and has never enjoyed playing with her, I've caught Abbie having a little growl at Isabella but nothing serius but enough to make me watch her.

    Today Abbie snapped at Isabella at a family bbq, she didn't growl just snapped at her face and then scuttled off at sat behind me.

    I really feel my next move is to have the family pet put down, my wife's against the idea so we don't know what to do.

    What's other peoples thoughts??


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  2. #2
    Established TDF Member Tel's Avatar
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    Way I see it you have no choice in that the dog has to go and once that's clear, it no longer is about
    you/family and what's best for her.

    At 13 she's an old dog sure, but plenty will take her on as a rescue dog even at this age where she
    can live out here remaining years in a good home.

    On the other hand you might feel that move to a new place at this age might be too stressful etc.
    and it would be kinder to put her down.

    Look at it this way though, the dog is already stressed out and has been for the past 3 years or at least
    until your little girl became more active, so IMO a change to another home won't be any worse than
    what the dog has gone through so far.

    So my advice would be to give the dog a chance somewhere else and contact dog rescue centers.

  3. #3
    Established TDF Member Iain Smith's Avatar
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    Could there have been any provocation?

    We have an elderly rough collie - roughly 14- who has always been extremely placid. However, if one of the local "young pups" gets a bit too exuberant, especially if it leaps at him and he doesn't see it coming, there is next-to-no warning before he goes for them. As far as we can tell the intent is to pin-and-hold, rather than to inflict injury. However, we are being careful to ask the owners of the "more exuberant" dogs to keep them at a bit more of a distance to avoid a catastrophe.

    Similarly, he snapped at my three-year-old niece at Xmas. Fortunately her mother/my sister (who is a vet) saw the incident (as I didn't) - my niece had stepped back onto him while he was asleep. It was felt that that constituted "reasonable provocation"!

    However, we don't have other animals/small children in the house, so don't have to worry about the prospect of a moment's inattention leading to major injury or worse.


    ...


    Oh...Gawd! I agree with Tel again. That's twice in as many days. Tel - this needs to stop! Can't someone start an HL discussion or something?
    Last edited by Iain Smith; 05-06-2016 at 09:41 PM.

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    As a former dog trainer, I have seen this sort of situation before. It's all to do with pecking order in a pack. A growl and a snap are your dog's way of saying I am still higher up the order than you; Get back. Whilst another dog (and most people) will very clearly understand this, and a dog will avert their eyes, maybe roll on their back to indicate submission and slink away. If it doesn't, then this is taken as a challenge to their superiority and a fight will ensure.

    Unfortunately your daughter doesn't understand any of this body language and the chances are the dog will deal with it the only way it knows.

    I wouldn't have the dog put down because it's only doing what is natural, but it would be out of my house straight away, or at the very least securely caged until a new owner can be found.

    Sorry. It's a heartbreaking situation.

  5. #5
    Established TDF Member rockystock1's Avatar
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    Thank you tel,

    We thought about another family or rescue centre, springers life expectancy is 12 - 14 years, would someone take on a dog slightly arthritic dog with less than 5 years left to live ?




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    Established TDF Member turnerjd's Avatar
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    deleted as I had misunderstood the OP
    Last edited by turnerjd; 05-06-2016 at 10:02 PM.

  7. #7
    Administrator Garf's Avatar
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    Afraid I disagree with the others as my wife is a vet and i have learned to be a little more direct and less gentle about this sort of thing.

    Options are ...

    1. Re-home the dog
    2. Put the dog Down
    3. Manage the situation

    I don't agree 1 is the obvious choice. In some ways it's the cop out. It's nice to think you could give the dog a loving new home and everyone ends up happy but the odds are against it. 13 years is pretty advanced for a dog and whilst there are people that re-home older dogs its definitely harder. Rehoming is extremely stressful for an animal, and gets increasingly stressful for older dogs. Do you really want your dog sitting in a glass box for 12 months or longer? Imogen and her colleagues fairly regularly have to put down institutionalised old dogs that have failed to be re-homed. Lots of people put older dogs in rescue centres because they think it's the best thing for the dog but it often isn't.

    Option 2 is the hardest emotionally, but resolves the situation. The dog has presumably had a good life and clearly been loved. You would be quite within your rights and people would understand if you put the dog down for the safety of the child. You would know that you are doing the best for the dog AND the child. The dog doesn't have to live in a situation it's clearly unhappy with, or go through the lonliness and stress of sitting in a rescue centre, and the child is no longer at risk. it's just the hardest option on you personally.

    Option 3 is a risk. You have a child and an animal which has now proven itself to be jealous and snappy. It clearly hasn't adjusted the the new hierarchy and is probably too old to do so. So you can ensure the child is never alone with the dog. As the dog gets older this will get progressively more difficult as the dog will become more unpredictable. It is, however, possible. you have to ask yourself - can you live with that change in lifestyle and yourself if you fail. The dog is unlikely to learn new behavioural patterns at it's age so retraining etc are extremely unlikely to be of any use, you would just have to watch carefully. In reality you are talking about a year or two at best.

    Not an easy one, sorry. I don't have a child so I cannot say what I would do but my instinct says put it down. If it was a one off then I'd maybe watch it for a while, but the dog is clearly distressed around your little girl, which means the girl is at risk. I adore animals. I mean adore them. Look up crazy cat man in the dictionary and there is a picture of me. However, it's an animal. that means it's behaviour cannot be predicted and ultimately it can be dangerous, especially to those it feels threaten it or piss it off. Tragically, your daughter appears to be in that role. As much as we love our pets, your daughter comes first.
    Last edited by Garf; 05-06-2016 at 10:07 PM.
    Gareth Burrows
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  8. #8
    Pedantic Pig Divemouse's Avatar
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    multiple dogs means a hierarchy amongst them
    You might want to re read the OP...
    hormone addled, protective, psychotic, hate filled killer

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    Established TDF Member turnerjd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Divemouse View Post
    You might want to re read the OP...
    You replied faster than I could delete....

  10. #10
    Established TDF Member jamesp's Avatar
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    My Sister has a scar on Her nose from a Jack Russel Terrier from when she was about 7 or 8, She is now 42.

    Still has the scar.

    I get the loyalty to the Springer, I`ve just lost a cat after 10 and a bit years, I`m not a dog person: but at the end of the day, you have an elderly grumpy animal doing what comes naturally and a 3 year old daughter who does not know what they are dealing with.

    How would you feel sitting in A&E with your daughter?


 
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