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Thread: Chainsaws

  1. #1
    I like spaghetti and meatballs gordyp's Avatar
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    Chainsaws

    Tapping into the knowledge of the forum!

    Need to buy a chainsaw for sorting the woodpile, its first task will be to chop down a couple of trees to make way for a new driveway leading to a new man cave.

    As ever I'm thinking of buying something second hand but good quality, what should I be buying?
    I stink, therefore I am.

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    Established TDF Member Nickpicks's Avatar
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    husqvana or stihl
    The major difference between a thing that might go wrong and a thing that cannot possibly go wrong is that when a thing that cannot possibly go wrong goes wrong it usually turns out to be impossible to get at or repair.

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    TDF Member Adrian66's Avatar
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    As above you can't go wrong

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    Established TDF Member MikeF's Avatar
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    I had the same dilemma and ended walking through B&Q and seeing of all things a flymo (I later discovered they are actually made by Husqvarna) electric chainsaw on clearance for 50, for occasional use it works very well and is a damn site easier than messing with a two stoke saw that's gummed up and damp after sitting in a shed for months. if I was using it on a farm I'd buy a petrol saw but for round the house the electric option is so much quieter and less hassle.

    looking at the bar this hasn't seen much use. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Flymo-Wood...cAAOSwll1Wxvum

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    Established TDF Member Paulo's Avatar
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    depends on how much work you want it to do and what it will be cutting.

    the bigger and harder the wood, the more of a workhorse you will need.

    I have a Husqvarna 365 with a 20 inch bar. It is one of the ones used by pros and foresters. It is probably overkill for most but I have a lot of hawthorn so it gets through that.

    If you are only going through soft pines etc up to say 6 inches then something cheap and cheerful will do the job.

    The most important thing is the PPE
    Remember anything you read on the internet was probably written by some guy sitting at home in his underpants! Including this !!

    Illegitimi non carborundum

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    Prior Member Tim Digger's Avatar
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    I have a 15 yearold Oregon from B&Q that has been brilliant. But have to confess to being impressed by the battery electric one my son in laws have got. Unfortunately don't know what it is, a Which recommended I do know. I think with 32volt battery power these are now what I would buy, much easier and quieter than 2 stroke.
    Evolution is great at solving problems. It's the methods that concern me.
    Tim Digger

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    TDF Member kevin.wilcox's Avatar
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    As has been mentioned, Husqvarna and Stihl are generally very reliable. I used to heat with only wood and kept a Stihl chainsaw in my pickup truck to collect fallen trees and such after big storms. It went weeks between uses (sometimes months) and it wasn't uncommon for it to be used after a summer storm in July or August then stored until hard use in -15 in January. Zero problems.

  8. #8
    Formerly sbc23cam Steve Clark's Avatar
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    I've got a husky 353 and very happy with it. 8 years old, works like new.

    I feel better knowing my kids can't easily start it. Not the same with an electric one and particularly the fancy Li-on stihl/ryobi/makita ones that you don't even have to plug in.

    Steve

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    Established TDF Member bubbleless's Avatar
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    I just cut down a couple of trees with a sawsall... reciprocating saw, worked well but it was only outside my house so had electric. And can be used for other things metal wood plasterboard etc

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    Established TDF Member Paulo's Avatar
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    Jonsered are excellent too. I used one for a day and was far more powerful than my husky and used about 50% of the fuel
    Remember anything you read on the internet was probably written by some guy sitting at home in his underpants! Including this !!

    Illegitimi non carborundum


 
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