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  1. #11
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    Narcolepsy isn't an automatic ban on driving if controlled so it may be possible to dive.

  2. #12
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    At least in a car you can slow the fuck down and stop within a matter of seconds. On a dive......no, I'm with Garf on this.

    If she's really really stuck on the idea of diving then why not think about sky-diving? No need to worry at all there - the ground will always catch you.

    But this is the internet. She needs to ask a diving doctor. Try the London Diving Chamber who will be able to have a chat and give a much more definite response.

  3. #13
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    And driving carries more risk of harm to others from a medical condition than diving.

  4. #14
    Bacon fiend londonsean69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbanator View Post
    I can't find it now, but I'm sure that I remember that if a Doc puts a depth limit on a medical (PADI at least), that it's as good as a "No" for training. Still looking for it though.
    I remember reading that, it's from around 2006-2007 training bulletins IIRC.

    Edit - Found it 2007

    Quote Originally Posted by PADI Europe
    Conditional Medicals
    Q: Can I accept a medical form when the physician gives approval for the person to dive with a depth limitation?
    A: No. The medical form must not impose any restrictions on the diver. The physician gives approval by marking the box on
    the form next to the statement “I find no medical conditions that I consider incompatible with diving.” If the doctor
    adds a comment that the diver must not exceed a certain depth, it becomes a “conditional” medical and, therefore, is
    unacceptable.
    No idea if this is still the current rules from PADI though.
    Last edited by londonsean69; 07-09-2015 at 10:42 PM.
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  5. #15
    Established TDF Member Paulo's Avatar
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    So PADI can enforce (too early to think of a different term) depth limits but a doc cannot?
    Remember anything you read on the internet was probably written by some guy sitting at home in his underpants! Including this !!

    Illegitimi non carborundum

  6. #16
    Pedantic Pig Divemouse's Avatar
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    Really? I used to have a medically imposed 20m on my form when I started with BSAC and it was never a problem for training.
    She said you know honey it's such a shame You'll never be any good at this game You bruise too easily

  7. #17
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    Same here. I was initially limited to pool only when I started with BSAC

  8. #18
    Bacon fiend londonsean69's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulo View Post
    So PADI can enforce (too early to think of a different term) depth limits but a doc cannot?
    PADI can choose whether to accept someone for training or not - ATEOTD it's PADI's standards that PADI instructors (should be) are teaching to. To stay within standards, you must use their paperwork, and their paperwork is a yes or no when it comes to fitness to dive.

    Please note: This was for PADI Europe, I remembered it from my time teaching in Lanzarote. PADI International (who cover the UK) may well be different, I'm sure the training dept would tell you immediately.

    Quote Originally Posted by Divemouse View Post
    Really? I used to have a medically imposed 20m on my form when I started with BSAC and it was never a problem for training.
    According to that training bulleting (granted, it's old and may well be out of date) PADI want either;
    1. Fit (no restrictions)
    2. Not fit


    For them, not fit includes any specific restrictions regarding depth.

    Quote Originally Posted by LearnerDiver View Post
    Same here. I was initially limited to pool only when I started with BSAC
    Fair enough, but that is BSAC, not PADI.
    Sean

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  9. #19
    feckface von clownstick BTS's Avatar
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    No one can impose a depth limit but one can be recommended. At the end of the day once in the water if you choose to go to 30 and your medic has recommended 25 who, other than yourself, is going to stop you....
    What to do? I only have three bullets and there are four of motley crew...

  10. #20
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    This applied to training, not already trained divers. If you were trained, but later had a depth limit imposed, perhaps as a result of a bend, then you would be expected to dive to that limit, often using nitrox.

    Human nature being what it is, I've had people ask whether that's the actual depth or an EAD.

    ATEOTD, there's no dive police. If you choose to put yourself at extra risk diving with a prior known medical condition that is considered to be contraindicative to diving, you won't find someone waiting to slap cuffs on you when you get out of the water.

    Similarly, no one has the right to force an instructor to train them. Even with an OK from a GP, I'm not sure I would take the student in the OP on.

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