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  1. #11
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    I'd also recommend Nick Robertson-Brown's book. I've been fortunate to receive some of his advice first hand and am now taking some shots I'm happy with despite never previously using a camera in Manual.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/1847...6&pf_rd_t=1201

    Follow the Amazon link on the RNLI website to get them 5%.

  2. #12
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    Have a look at this website http://www.uwphotographyguide.com/ .This has a lot of useful information

    Cheers Graham
    " Fancy going all that way just to take pictures of fish "

    http://robinhooddiveclub.com/ https://www.facebook.com/groups/rohodiveclub/

  3. #13
    TDF Member Paul H's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by String View Post
    Practice taking photos with different ISOs, different apertures and so on to get a feel of what each setting does and what effect it has on the rest.

    http://photography.tutsplus.com/tuto...re--photo-3028 might be a good primer to read.
    This is an excellent link, the exact starting point I was looking for!
    If we get blown out at the weekend I think I'll head out for some practice.

  4. #14
    BSAC Council Candidate 2017 TrevorB's Avatar
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    I have a Canon S95 which is not too dissimilar to your 110, only it will not zoom when in movie record, the 110 will

    I have used it a lot on land and I think you learn quicker, underwater slows things down.

    I would agree with all the comments,

    I have now purchased an Samsung NX500 this is again is a bridge camera (stills and movies), but as yet there is not an underwater housing. My skills have improved and I am working my way through problems, from steady cam filming to editing the H265 footage it produces.

    I have been writing up my experiences for on on-line magazine and have now filmed both my sons weddings and put a BSAC filming course together (somewhere in the BSAC pipeline, it's a long pipe)

    I think you never stop learning, and there is so much help on the internet, just persevere, don't rush to filming underwater and never be afraid to ask questions
    Diving Officer BSAC 9137
    Leeds Beckett University Branch

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Digger View Post
    If you are serious about u/w photography you have a long road.

    1. Learn to use what you have on land in manual mode, it's a good camera, get a book on digital photography in general there are lots around. Read it and invent practical projects for yourself. IE go out locally to photograph a given subject don't get distracted into snaps. take a note book write down the settings and what you were hoping to achieve for each shot (that will at least slow you down and make you think about each one, although it is less necessary if you can access the metadata in whatever you down load to). Download and critically examine all your shots and label them as to your own classification Lightroom and others make this and hence retrieval easy. Try to learn from every poor shot.
    2. When you can use it on land with out thinking about how to move the dials etc to get where you want then take it underwater in a housing. First available light. An underwater course from a pro would help at this stage.
    3. Get a strobe learn to use it.
    4. Now start to think about whether you want to go wide angle IE Wrecks etc if you do. This is about 2-4 years ahead. Then you should by then have enough knowledge to know if you want to go interchangeable lens (mirrorless 4/3rds DSLR or wet lens on your existing camera.
    5. If you haven't drowned it by then!!!!
    Tim has omitted THE key piece of advice which should be at around 2a. - get insurance for flooding it.

    Trust me it will happen sooner or later

  6. #16
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    You could also book a lesson or a trip that has a photographer on.
    However, there are some I'd definitely avoid, even though they purport to 'specialise' in compacts.
    I feel that if an instructor can teach the whole range from compacts to dSLRs, then they will be in a better position to advise you, when they (and you) know where you want to go with photography.

    Although you have a very fast leaning curve with digital as you can review your pictures real-time, as Chris said, people that have leaned with film tend to think about things a little more before pressing the shutter as they knew that it'd be a day or two before they saw the results.

    Having said that, although I can turn out a reasonably focused and exposed picture without resorting to digital manipulation, I struggle with composition and not having a 'photographic eye'. Initially, you can let the camera take care of focus and exposure and then learn yourself, it's a bit harder to teach creativity.
    'I saw some purple slug things on the Scylla, so I squished them' - #MiniBodger

  7. #17
    Could start a fight in a convent. Mikael's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foggy View Post
    Tim has omitted THE key piece of advice which should be at around 2a. - get insurance for flooding it.

    Trust me it will happen sooner or later
    For an s110? Surely they can be picked up second hand off ebay for less then the price of insurance over x years of paying for it?
    Why is it that with everything in life I always find a more difficult way of doing it (and not intentionally)

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikael View Post
    For an s110? Surely they can be picked up second hand off ebay for less then the price of insurance over x years of paying for it?
    Yup, Kirstie did that, especially as the housing rarely has any electronics in it to ruin.
    'I saw some purple slug things on the Scylla, so I squished them' - #MiniBodger

  9. #19
    All hail ZOM Woz's Avatar
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    So I'm in no way an expert but I've recently moved to DSLR from an S95/Ikelite setup.

    For UK waters and the wide angle stuff I like to take photos of, I found that even with a wide angle wet lens I wasn't getting the photos I wanted. For close ups, it was great. The problem in the UK is the crap in the water- the mantra "get close, then get even closer" holds out very well as you can much through the crap and get shots even in less than 1m viz.

    Switched to a DSLR and the improvement in the photos was dramatic. I've got a Canon 50D with a 10-18 lens on it and you can get so close you're touching the subject with the dome port but the wide anglenosity captures the scene really well. As the camera is a few years old, it's easy to pick up bodies off eBay for about 140. It's the lenses that are the pricey part but that 10-18 was 180 brand new.

    The 50D has a couple of settings C1 and C2 where you can "save" settings. One I have set for use with strobes (full manual, ISO 400, 1/60 and F8) and the other for use without (full manual, ISO 1600, 1/60 and F5.6). The technical bit is relatively easy to learn- the wide angle lens has such a huge depth of field that the aperture setting makes dick all difference so I just set the shutter speed to 1/60 and vary the exposure with the F stop. I might need to fiddle a bit more to get the background exposure right but that's more playing with it and the beauty of digital with its instant review. For macro, there's probably more to it but I haven't got round to playing with that yet.

    For me, the learning curve is much more about understanding composition and use of light. That's the tricky bit.
    Last edited by Woz; 15-09-2015 at 03:25 PM.
    Views expressed here are my own and are not representative of any organisation. If you would like an official reply, I suggest you ask the question on a website the organisation is responsible for, or contact them directly using the phone.
    https://www.facebook.com/BSACChairmanWoz/

  10. #20
    Prior Member Tim Digger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woz View Post
    For me, the learning curve is much more about understanding composition and use of light. That's the tricky bit.
    I think even for the Pros that goes on forever.
    Evolution is great at solving problems. It's the methods that concern me.
    Tim Digger


 
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