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Wibs
10-08-2020, 01:01 PM
What's the preferred / correct way of disposing of used lime?

Bag it and bin it in the normal waste? Issues?

Barrygoss
10-08-2020, 01:52 PM
What's the preferred / correct way of disposing of used lime?

Bag it and bin it in the normal waste? Issues?

Ask your local tip their policy for the disposal of CaCo3

B

colinicky
10-08-2020, 02:09 PM
So Barry what is your preferred way ?

jamesp
10-08-2020, 02:15 PM
Reduce acidification of the oceans.

Wibs
10-08-2020, 02:18 PM
Reduce acidification of the oceans.

At least it's a little lighter to carry home!

Barrygoss
10-08-2020, 02:20 PM
So Barry what is your preferred way ?

it was an answer designed to make wibs go out and learn that information (that he should know from MOD1 anyway)
Calcium Carbonate is the end result of used lime = calcite/chalk/limestone.
same as you probably - bin it, not in a plastic bag.

B

Chrisch
10-08-2020, 02:32 PM
...
Calcium Carbonate is the end result of used lime ...

Can you not (in that case) put it on the garden? In small quantities it is good for most soils and plants. Certainly you could dig it in if you are in the habit of deep digging. My dad's old house in Linconlshire would have benefited from lime and probably a fair bit of it.

How much do you guys generate?

Spirit of Guernsey
10-08-2020, 02:32 PM
Mine goes in the hardcore recycling bag.

Paulo
10-08-2020, 02:34 PM
How much do you guys generate?

About 2.5kg a dive day

Wibs
10-08-2020, 02:37 PM
Obviously I recycle as much as I can. Throw away the lumps and dry out the remainder.

Or maybe not.



The issue is that I've ended up with half a dozen bags of the stuff. But James' point is probably the best answer.

And yes, it was covered on the course. And yes, I just wanted to know what you vastly more experienced divers do with the stuff when you ended up with a load.

It's a bit like having loads of cat litter. A little in the refuse is fine. Too much means they want it disposed as 'medical waste'.

It does appear that nobody's particularly bothered with it as it's not that poisonous.

Divemouse
10-08-2020, 02:40 PM
It's a bit like having loads of cat litter
What you do there is switch to wood pellets and use it to heat the house.

Chrisch
10-08-2020, 03:09 PM
Mine goes in the hardcore recycling bag.

Doesn't that make it hard to see the pictures?

Chrisch
10-08-2020, 03:15 PM
About 2.5kg a dive day

Ah. Probably too much to get rid of on the lawn. (Lawns like lime generally)

jamesp
10-08-2020, 04:43 PM
I have used it in the past as oil absorbant in work, to clean the floor.

Bit too much dust though.

colinicky
10-08-2020, 04:54 PM
it was an answer (that he should know from MOD1 anyway)

B

I did my mod 1 years ago & certainly I was not told how to dispose of it .
Times & instructors change though

Spirit of Guernsey
10-08-2020, 05:10 PM
Doesn't that make it hard to see the pictures?

I'll set 'em up................

Dave1w
10-08-2020, 06:20 PM
Given nowadays we donít have as many disposable plastic bags, I did find that you canít put your spent sorb in an Aldi compostable plastic bag and leave it on the side.....


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witchieblackcat
10-08-2020, 10:41 PM
I put mine in the garden waste bin and the council take it away.
It's a non-toxic mineral which left long becomes chalk; just don't breathe the dust or you'll be coughing like you have COVID-19

Neilwood
11-08-2020, 04:10 PM
Does Divemouse not want quite a bit for the bodies under the patio?

Divemouse
11-08-2020, 05:12 PM
Nah - the chickens take care of the wet bits and the bones can just be ground up and mixed with the cement - no lumps to turn up later.

Nickpicks
11-08-2020, 05:32 PM
Nah - the chickens take care of the wet bits and the bones can just be ground up and mixed with the cement - no lumps to turn up later.

Did anyone else find it a bit creepy how easily that answer came out? ;)

gobfish1
11-08-2020, 07:02 PM
Im never going to Suffolk that s all I can say.